Bull Moose

Bull Moose

Baxter State Park, ME Its late September and this Moose isn't just out for a stroll. He's looking for a mate. Mating season runs thru September and October and Bulls are much more aggressive during these months. Not a good time to get in a Moose's way! Photo © Bob Metcalfe

Moose Tracks in Sand

Moose Tracks in Sand

Millinocket, ME Moose tracks are roughly 5 to 6 inches long and 4 to 5 inches wide. Much larger than White-tailed deer tracks at about 3 inches long by 2 inches wide. But sometimes Moose calf prints can be confused with large deer. If you think it might be a calf, look for mother Moose's tracks in the area. Also use caution, as Moose mothers aggressively defend their young. Photo © Bob Metcalfe

Moose Scat

Moose Scat

Intervale, NH Moose scat is often in this dry pellet form when Moose are feeding on woody material as in this late winter photo. Scat can be a loose pile with pellets hardly showing when Moose are feeding on aquatic plants during the warmer months. Photo © Bob Metcalfe

Moose Incisor Scrapes

Moose Incisor Scrapes

Peterborough, NH Photo shows both old and new sign of Moose winter feeding on the inner bark of Red Maple. Bark is scraped in an upward motion of the head with lower front teeth. Photo © Bob Metcalfe

Red Fox

Red Fox

Peterborough, NH Red Foxes are common throughout New England. Look for them along field and forest edges, especially in early morning and evening. Red Foxes scent mark prominent objects along their trail with urine, which leaves a mild "skunk like" smell in the immediate area. Photo © Bob Metcalfe

Fox Track

Fox Track

Red Fox tracks show four toes in a symmetrical pattern, often with claw marks showing. The bar or line across the rear of the track is made by the metacarpal pad on the fox's foot. This bar is distinctive to Red Fox and helps to make a positive identification. Photo © Bob Metcalfe

Woodchuck

Woodchuck

A Woodchuck, recently awakened from its long winter sleep, gazes out onto a springtime landscape. Woodchucks are one of New England's true hibernators, along with the Meadow Jumping Mouse and the Brown Bat. Photo © Emily Metcalfe

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Moose Tracks in Sand

Millinocket, ME Moose tracks are roughly 5 to 6 inches long and 4 to 5 inches wide. Much larger than White-tailed deer tracks at about 3 inches long by 2 inches wide. But sometimes Moose calf prints can be confused with large deer. If you think it might be a calf, look for mother Moose's tracks in the area. Also use caution, as Moose mothers aggressively defend their young. Photo © Bob Metcalfe